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post #31 of 163 Old 08-21-2015, 12:48 PM
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Originally Posted by sneals2000 View Post
Does everyone in the US have a physical connection fast enough to carry OTA HDTV quality video though?
Using RF spectrum for a connection to a single person is not very efficient when the same spectrum can send content to 9 million people simultaneously? So cabled connections are optimal for unicast stuff like VOD, Netflix, web surfing etc., but OTA is optimal for broadcast/multicast linear TV and live TV?
Physical connection for OTA? Sending OTA to 9 million as opposed to 1 makes more sense to me.

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I'm from the UK, I guess I forgot about reality TV because I despise it so much, it can all burn and die. Would the viewer numbers really drop so much if the baking show was on netflix instead? Twits (tweeters? twitterers? twits sounds about right lol) can always organise a more convenient time to watch it amongst themselves rather than be dictated to by the BBC's scheduling.
Reality TV has become the Lowest common denominator, yet I did enjoy COPS in its first few seasons.
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post #32 of 163 Old 08-21-2015, 05:02 PM
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"Physical connection for OTA?"

I think the gentleman was asking, do most people have an internet connection fast enough to carry video quality equal to or better than OTA HDTV?
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post #33 of 163 Old 08-21-2015, 08:07 PM
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Definitely. Only around 12% of UK households subscribe to Netflix. 97% of UK households have a digital TV service of some sort. You don't get 10 million people simultaneously watching anything on Netflix in the UK.
Circular arguement, the numbers are that way because the baking show (and its ilk) are on digital and not on netflix. If they decided tomorrow to move from the BBC to netflix, their viewer numbers would not change much, they'd all just move to netflix.

You could say that digital TV is free here and netflix charges, but that doesn't really apply to the US where they have far fewer free quality channels.

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You're missing the point - it's not about people on Twitter deciding to watch a TV show, it's about people watching the TV show sharing the experience.
I realise that, but how is anything different if they all just decide to stream it at a more convenient time?

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High-end drama and Sci Fi doesn't get huge audiences.
Well they damn well should because they are the only shows worth watching, bring back firefly and crucify (literally) simon cowell. Doesn't affect me anyway, I pay my license fee then torrent whatever I want to watch.
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post #34 of 163 Old 08-22-2015, 02:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Ormy View Post
Circular arguement, the numbers are that way because the baking show (and its ilk) are on digital and not on netflix. If they decided tomorrow to move from the BBC to netflix, their viewer numbers would not change much, they'd all just move to netflix.
I don't think that is the case. I very much doubt Netflix will achieve 91% market penetration in the UK, as digital TV has. (Digital OTA is in 75% of households, with the rest being Freesat, Sky, cable or IPTV only)

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You could say that digital TV is free here and netflix charges, but that doesn't really apply to the US where they have far fewer free quality channels.
Yes - but my point was that the rest of the world wasn't like the US - and that OTA TV (and FTA/FTV TV) was a much stronger proposition outside the US. That was the point of my original post - that although OTA TV's days may be numbered in the US, they may not be outside of it.

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I realise that, but how is anything different if they all just decide to stream it at a more convenient time?
Just don't see that happening, that's not really how social media works for the wider audience (only really hardcore people would use Netflix as an appointment-to-view platform) It hasn't happened to any massive degree with other shows like Game of Thrones etc. which would be real must-see, shared-experience types of show if only on linear OTA TV.

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Well they damn well should because they are the only shows worth watching, bring back firefly and crucify (literally) simon cowell.
In your opinion. The UK seems to disagree... At the moment Great British Bake Off is the ratings darling. Peaked at over 11million for episode 3...

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post #35 of 163 Old 08-22-2015, 02:42 AM
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Originally Posted by sneals2000 View Post
Great British Bake Off is the ratings darling. Peaked at over 11million for episode 3...
A sign of the coming apocolypse I'm sure.

Don't these people have kitchens of their own? Why do these people not just, you know, bake?
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post #36 of 163 Old 08-22-2015, 03:17 AM
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A sign of the coming apocolypse I'm sure.

Don't these people have kitchens of their own? Why do these people not just, you know, bake?
There speaks someone who doesn't understand the Great British Public and their relationship with TV... (Can you imagine Bake Off running in its UK form on US TV unaltered?)
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post #37 of 163 Old 08-22-2015, 05:51 AM
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Originally Posted by sneals2000 View Post
There speaks someone who doesn't understand the Great British Public and their relationship with TV... (Can you imagine Bake Off running in its UK form on US TV unaltered?)
I am British and I like TV, I just don't understand the recent obsession with reality TV. Big Brother was novel when it first aired, it was something new, now TV is full of that crap. All the dancing ones, britains got talent, all the celebrity-on-an-island ones, they're all complete garbage. Poor quality daytime gameshows complete with bad one liners, no problem, endless hospital dramas, no problem, reruns of lackluster 70s/80s sitcoms, pretty good. The only one I actually watch on occasion is The Apprentice, and that's only because I know someone involved with the production.

I find it hilarious that quite a few US shows are very popular here (West wing, boston legal, parks & recreation, southpark are some of my fav shows) and they show unaltered. When a UK show goes to the US it has to be completey rewritten for americans (made unfunny), e.g. the office (actually some of the american episodes are ok).

I can imagine the minority of americans that would actually understand the jokes and references in Bake Off would love it, but that's not very many people I expect.
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post #38 of 163 Old 09-27-2016, 02:44 PM
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From the results of the latest incentive auction, there wasn't much interest as they thought?


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post #39 of 163 Old 01-20-2017, 11:01 AM
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post #40 of 163 Old 10-26-2018, 10:07 AM
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I can't find a good article on how HDTV (or digital technology in general) was able to reduce BW. I recall the days when digital required 5X the BW of analog. Does anyone have any links to how it's done?
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post #41 of 163 Old 10-26-2018, 10:50 AM
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This may be some reading for "starters":
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_television
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_broadcasting



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post #42 of 163 Old 10-26-2018, 01:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Eddie_T View Post
I can't find a good article on how HDTV (or digital technology in general) was able to reduce BW. I recall the days when digital required 5X the BW of analog. Does anyone have any links to how it's done?
The bandwidth of a digital channel is 6 MHz, exactly the same as an analog channel. But digital TV allows sub channels in the same assigned channel.

However, the number of TV broadcast channels has been reduced by the FCC, which was following the laws passed by Congress, which was influenced by business interests that wanted to take the frequencies away from the broadcasters for their own profit.
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post #43 of 163 Old 10-26-2018, 04:33 PM
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Half of the answer would TRY to explain WHY Analog TV (e.g. NTSC) took so MUCH Bandwidth, compared to how much "information" actually NEEDS to be conveyed....but explaining the OTHER half will help to point out the differences. MPEG2 (and later ~2X more efficient MPEG4 and ~4X more efficient HVEC) COMPRESS the raw data samples to a much lower data rate. THIS is the heart of why ATSC can pack in as many as 2-3 HD or 6-10+ SD Channels onto a single 6 MHz wide channel, although the Powerful Reed-Solomon Error Detection and Correction CODING also plays an important role so that you don't SEE the effect of infrequent bit errors.
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post #44 of 163 Old 10-26-2018, 06:29 PM
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You can see how ATSC makes much more efficient use of the 6 MHz channel:
http://www.sigidwiki.com/wiki/ATSC_Broadcast
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post #45 of 163 Old 10-27-2018, 10:47 AM
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OTA will never go away...the higher channels were needed for wireless carriers and there's an antenna limitation as to how far they can go in low frequencies. Analog in the radio mode will stay around for a long time because there's no need for new Spectrum and too many analog radios out there...TV required converter boxes but were easy to add...not so easy with auto radios...just not gonna happen..AM frequencies are too low for anybody other than broadcast.
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post #46 of 163 Old 10-27-2018, 11:11 AM
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OTA will never go away...the higher channels were needed for wireless carriers and there's an antenna limitation as to how far they can go in low frequencies. Analog in the radio mode will stay around for a long time because there's no need for new Spectrum and too many analog radios out there...TV required converter boxes but were easy to add...not so easy with auto radios...just not gonna happen..AM frequencies are too low for anybody other than broadcast.
I would hope that FM and AM don't go anywhere... they use a tiny amount of spectrum, and they are embedded in a lot more devices, namely cars. FM and AM radio stations will have to consolidate, but they still have a strong following in both rural and urban markets, and as much as people are streaming more, there are still vast swaths of the US that have patchy or unreliable mobile data service. I have a feeling that eventually the TV networks will disappear from the air and be apps or pay tv channels, but I think OTA will be around for a long time with syndicated content or diginet type of stuff. There's always a market for that, plus local news and weather.
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post #47 of 163 Old 10-28-2018, 04:45 PM
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I was looking for an article explaining how digitization could be accomplished without the old need for 5 digital samples per cycle of a sine wave. The digital spectrum appears to be better utilized but what was the breakthrough to pack it that way. The spectrum is still analog it is just packed somehow with digitized data. I would venture a guess from the spectrum that it somehow involves levels as there is more amplitude shown, but I am seeking an article(s) on how it is done.
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/8VSB
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post #49 of 163 Old 10-28-2018, 08:09 PM
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8VSB, just what I was looking for, thanks!
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post #50 of 163 Old 10-29-2018, 10:50 AM
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I was looking for an article explaining how digitization could be accomplished without the old need for 5 digital samples per cycle of a sine wave. The digital spectrum appears to be better utilized but what was the breakthrough to pack it that way. The spectrum is still analog it is just packed somehow with digitized data. I would venture a guess from the spectrum that it somehow involves levels as there is more amplitude shown, but I am seeking an article(s) on how it is done.
There are two aspects to digital TV.

1. Modulation - how digital values are sent via a radio frequency signal. US ATSC 1.0 uses 8VSB, most of the rest of the world uses a COFDM system (2,000 to 32,000 separate individual low-speed carriers, carrying anything from 2-8 bits per symbol) packed into a 6-8MHz RF channel) The newer modulation systems like DVB-T2 (on-air in the UK since 2009) and ATSC 3.0 are massively more efficient than the first gen DVB-T and ATSC 8VSB systems - allowing for more data to be carried in the same spectrum OR the same data to be sent in a far more robust manner (extending coverage, reducing power or antenna requirements) or a trade-off between the two. Digital TV systems allow you to carry anything etween 8 and 40Mbs within a single channel that would once have carried a single NTSC, PAL or SECAM analogue video service. The US ATSC system carries 19.2Mbs in 6MHz.

2. Digital compression. Digital TV wouldn't have been feasible without MPEG2, then H.264/AVC and now H.265/HEVC, digital video compression, and MP2/AC3/AAC audio compression. This takes an SD uncompressed signal of ~120Mbs (720x480/29.97frames per second with 4:2:0 8-bit video) and allows you to compress it to ~3Mbs MPEG2, 1.5Mbs H264 etc. or you can take an uncompressed HD signal of ~745Mbs (1920x1080/29.97frames per second with 4:2:0 bit video) which can be compressed to 3Mbs-20+Mbs. Digital compression is what allows you to compress by more than 100:1 - it does this by comparing sequential frames, and only sending the differences between frames (often these differences are very small) and compresses these differences (and the occasional complete frame) using compression that uses the minimum amount of data to reconstruct a reasonable quality version of the source frame, not an exact copy (a bit like JPEG compresses still images)
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post #51 of 163 Old 10-30-2018, 05:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie_T View Post
I was looking for an article explaining how digitization could be accomplished without the old need for 5 digital samples per cycle of a sine wave. The digital spectrum appears to be better utilized but what was the breakthrough to pack it that way. The spectrum is still analog it is just packed somehow with digitized data. I would venture a guess from the spectrum that it somehow involves levels as there is more amplitude shown, but I am seeking an article(s) on how it is done.
You don't need anywhere near 5 samples per sine wave....NYQUIST SAMPLING RATE THEOREM says that for a signal with BANDWIDTH=B, the minimum Sampling Rate=2*B to resolve that signal:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nyquist_rate
So for Phoneline Modem operating in say 300-2400 Bandwidth, B=2400 Hz and 2B=4800 Hz:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nyquis...mpling_theorem

In practice, Frequency Shift Key (FSK) Systems operate at up to 1200 Symbols/sec (with just 1 bit/Symbol) over a typical Phone Line....which works out to exactly 1 waveform cycle at 1200-Hz Audio Freq for "1" Symbol and barely more than 1/2 a waveform cycle at 2200-Hz Audio Freq for "0" Symbol:
http://www.softelectro.ru/bell202_en.html

Quadrature Phase Shift Key (QPSK) waveforms provide 2 bits/Symbol at 1200 Symbols/sec = 2400 bps, using a choice of 4 different differential phase shifts on a 1800-Hz Audio Carrier [e.g. 45, 135, 225 & 315-deg], corresponding to 00, 01, 10 and 11...and just 1-1/2 Cycles per Symbol:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phase-shift_keying

In the mid-70's, 8-Phase Shift Key (8PSK) provided 3 bits/Symbol for 4800 bps, and was more robust against Impulse Switching Noise than QAM-16 with a constellation of 16 points, having a variety of different Amplitude/Phase Shift layouts:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quadra...ude_modulation

However, the FIRST Phone Line Modems I remember using in early '70's employed 4VSB (Sebit-24 at 2400-bps), and 8VSB (Sebit-48 at 4800-bps). Eight (or Four) different Amplitude Levels carried 3 (or 2) bits/Symbol at 1200 Symbols/sec. An Audio Carrier was Amplitude Modulated with these voltage shifts, generating a Double Sideband Signal. To FIT into the voice bandwidth, it was necessary to partially Roll-Off the Lower Sideband (hence the term Vestigial Side Band Modulation):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single..._sideband_(VSB)

So the ATSC 8VSB Waveform actually dates back to the very early days of Datacom via Phonelines. PS: 16-VSB [without any Error Correction CODING] also made it into the ATSC Specs, but was ONLY for potential use over Robust CATV Networks...but more robust QAM-64 was used instead:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/8VSB

FYI: Bell Modem p/n and ITU V.xx Phoneline Modem Waveform List....and BTW: I became the "GO-TO" Modem Guy shortly after starting work way back in 1969:
http://www.reeve.com/Documents/Voice...ards%20No1.pdf
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post #52 of 163 Old 11-16-2018, 01:18 AM
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Clear uncompressed signals, wireless & free of charge, now gee who actually would want such a thing??
Sorry, but no such thing and uncompressed signals. All digital video that is supplied to the home, no matter the delivery method, is compressed.
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Source is a big issue so the transmission is only as good as its source.
Source is not an issue with the network feeds of ABC, CBS, CW, NBC and PBS.

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THIS is the heart of why ATSC can pack in as many as 2-3 HD or 6-10+ SD Channels onto a single 6 MHz wide channel
You gotta be joking. ATSC using MPEG-2 can barely handle a single rapid action 1080i HD stream, let alone two. Rapid action 1080i video has macroblocking issues. It takes 2-pass encoding to allow for the rapid action video to look decent. I do not know of any 2-pass OTA encoders.

I take a lot of 1080i 29.97 ~35 Mbps MPEG-2 4:2:0 video and IVTC/recode it to H.264 23.976 @ 6 Mbps (2-pass encoding). I can even get it down to 4 Mbps and you will not find any issues. I can't say the same to what local affiliates do with the high quality video that they get from the networks (Fox excluded).

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post #55 of 163 Old 11-17-2018, 05:02 PM
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Earlier, a user asked how many US Households could receive an OTA Type Video Program via their Internet Connection. Fol. indicates that in Dec2017 about 16% of Households DID NOT SUBSCRIBE to an I-N Provider [ignoring I-N to SmartPhones]....not so much because it isn't AVAILABLE (such as Remote Farms), but mostly because they don't WANT it [might already have it to SmartPhone]....or can't AFFORD it (based on reading OTHER articles):
http://www.leichtmanresearch.com/84...ervice-at-home

Impact of CUTTING PAID CABLE SUBSCRIPTIONS (aka "Cord Cutters")....and note that many DirecTV/Dish subs moved their payments over to DirecTV-NOW (via I-N):
http://www.leichtmanresearch.com/wp...es-3Q-2018.pdf

Fol. Chart shows how many I-N Providers are AVAILABLE to customers at various I-N (Down/Up) Speeds throughout the US:
http://broadbandmap.fcc.gov/#/area-...osw&speed=25_3
ADSL, which can "typically" support ONE HD Video Channel over 2-pair Copper Wires (POTS), has replaced nearly ALL of the slow speed DSL lines. And about 96% of Households COULD subscribe to 100+ Mbps I-N Service....IF they wanted to PAY for it.....but MOST do NOT (not shown in this Chart, 25-50 Mbps is more "typical" of Service actually paid for).

Although latest report from Akamai is a bit out of date (Q1 2017), it does provide insight into the dire I-N status for many RURAL Areas, showing the ADOPTION Rates for various States:
http://www.akamai.com/fr/fr/multime...ity-report.pdf
Best State (Delaware) has 98% Adoption Rate of 4+ Mbps Providers, whereas Worst State (Virginia) has only 77% and second Worst State (Arkansas) has only 81%. [I THINK it includes SmartPhone I-N connections.]

Highest and Lowest I-N Speed Test Results for users in various Countries [3.6 Mbps in US per this Report]:
http://tradingeconomics.com/united-...internet-speed

By 2022 (give or take), SpaceX plans to have enough VERY LOW ORBIT Satellites in orbit to provide "High-Speed" I-N Service to ANYWHERE on Earth you can install a SAT Antenna....and of course, there are multiple SAT I-N Services already available:
http://www.theverge.com/2018/11/15/...net-from-space
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post #56 of 163 Old 11-17-2018, 05:43 PM
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Earlier, a user asked how many US Households could receive an OTA Type Video Program via their Internet Connection.
Took a quick look at the study you linked to, thanks for posting. We are in a slightly unusual position.

We use DSL for wired access even though there is DSL and Cable in our town. We have a long driveway; the cost to extend cable 600 feet is high. The good news is several years ago we switched to a CLEC so even using the same POTS loop we have much higher speed and the connection is more reliable.

My wife and I both have smart phones but coverage is poor here in terrain challenged NH. Our phones are Wi-Fi first so when we are at home or at our kids houses the phone connects via whatever broadband connection exists at that location.

We have always used OTA. The TV digital conversion has worked out well for us, even though we are in a fringe area. Subchannels have increased the number of available channels. Hopefully migration to ATSC 3.0 will improve the situation even with the FCC repack channel reduction.

Hopefully OTA will never go away. Evolution shows that over specialization is dangerous. Having multiple ways of communicating is important. For example in our town we are finalizing renewal of the cable franchise agreement. The cable company is only guaranteeing 24 hours of backup during a power outage. Here in NH week long power outages occur every couple of years due to massive ice storms. Folks that depend on cable will lose: TV, Internet and phone.
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post #57 of 163 Old 11-18-2018, 05:23 PM
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You gotta be joking. ATSC using MPEG-2 can barely handle a single rapid action 1080i HD stream, let alone two. Rapid action 1080i video has macroblocking issues. It takes 2-pass encoding to allow for the rapid action video to look decent. I do not know of any 2-pass OTA encoders.
The current generation of OTA encoders are designed to do 2HD/4SD on a 6mhz 8VSB channel. Our local NBC and Telemundo station is running 2HD/2SD at 1080i/480i, and while it definitely doesn't look as good as it was when it was 1HD/?SD with just NBC, it doesn't actually look bad. It's a bit flatter, and doesn't have that "wow" effect on the opening sequence of SNL, but the detail is still pretty good, and there isn't obvious macroblocking. The PyeongChang Olympics weren't quite as good as in previous years, but they weren't horrible like Comcast's bit-starved MPEG-4 that look like utter garbage and is totally lacking detail. I'd much rather have 19mbps MPEG-2, which is the gold standard for HD broadcasting, but the current generation of encoders is really, really impressive in how much processing horsepower they can throw at encoding.

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I take a lot of 1080i 29.97 ~35 Mbps MPEG-2 4:2:0 video and IVTC/recode it to H.264 23.976 @ 6 Mbps (2-pass encoding). I can even get it down to 4 Mbps and you will not find any issues. I can't say the same to what local affiliates do with the high quality video that they get from the networks (Fox excluded).
The problem is that Comcast's real-time encoders just can't get to 3.8mbps CBR without a massive loss of quality. The local affilitates who are doing MPEG-2 are using a stat mux, so they have some more room to work with. Comcast went from 13-15mbps MPEG-2 for their HD to 3 HDs in a stat mux on a 38mbps QAM to 4 MPEG-2 HDs CBR at 9mbps each for a total of 38mbps in a QAM, and over time the quality didn't get any worse, although they were always a bit beyond the limit of the technology, and had crummy looking video all along. That's an indication of where the encoding technology went. However, when they moved to MPEG-4 and used a 3.8mbps MPEG-4 CBR encode for most channels, with 4.2mbps for a few channels, they went way too far, and the result was a total mess. The technology has improved somewhat, and their channels look slightly less atrocious now, but they're still pretty bad, as scenes with a lot of motion or detail are just too bit starved without a stat mux to expand into. AFAIK, they are doing all their encoding in software on regular x86 servers on an IP encoding network in Denver that puts the C-band signals onto IP, where they get encoded to MPEG-4 by their software encoding servers, and then moved via IP to local headends across the country where they are "slotted" onto QAMs for the ride to the XG1 or XG2, at which point they are either stored to disk, decoded for viewing, or put back onto an IP network for transport the last few hundred feet via MoCA to satellite box for final decoding.

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Took a quick look at the study you linked to, thanks for posting. We are in a slightly unusual position.

We use DSL for wired access even though there is DSL and Cable in our town. We have a long driveway; the cost to extend cable 600 feet is high. The good news is several years ago we switched to a CLEC so even using the same POTS loop we have much higher speed and the connection is more reliable.
You are in a very usual position. Most people with rear/flag lots and long driveways are too far away from the CO/wirecenter or DSLAM to get anything decent, and adding .6kft of your own driveway to the distance doesn't help things. There have been numerous posts on DSLReports about how people have built little equipment sheds for their cable modem by the road, and run fiber or used their own VDSL to get the bandwidth to their house, which is a less than ideal solution IMO, but I can see why some do it versus sky-high costs to extend cable plant.

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We have always used OTA. The TV digital conversion has worked out well for us, even though we are in a fringe area. Subchannels have increased the number of available channels. Hopefully migration to ATSC 3.0 will improve the situation even with the FCC repack channel reduction.

Hopefully OTA will never go away. Evolution shows that over specialization is dangerous. Having multiple ways of communicating is important. For example in our town we are finalizing renewal of the cable franchise agreement. The cable company is only guaranteeing 24 hours of backup during a power outage. Here in NH week long power outages occur every couple of years due to massive ice storms. Folks that depend on cable will lose: TV, Internet and phone.
You're in a VERY challenging market for OTA, but due to the terrain, and the oddly large size of the Boston DMA, and how far the transmitters in Needham are from the northern parts of the Boston DMA in NH. That's definitely an issue with cable, if you want reliable TV, you have to have OTA or DBS and your own generator and fuel supply to keep things running. If you have no cell service, you can use a cell booster as long as long as there is service within a short distance of your location, and if that is wired to your transfer switch, then you're very likely to have cell phone and internet service via LTE even when all utilities are down.
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post #58 of 163 Old 11-18-2018, 06:07 PM
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If you have no cell service, you can use a cell booster as long as long as there is service within a short distance of your location, and if that is wired to your transfer switch, then you're very likely to have cell phone and internet service via LTE even when all utilities are down.
Thanks for the response. Our broadband is via DSL. Copper loop is fairly long 13k ft back to the central office, but no remote terminals to worry about. We occasionally experience extended power outages due to massive ice storms when we and most of the state are without power for a week. A one day outage is an adventure but after that it gets old.

In terms of DSL speed I doubt shaving off 600 feet will make a huge difference and would be costly to implement. We would need to run 600 feet of cable, provide housing for the remote modem along with lightning protection and provide power from the house.

During an outage we can fire up a portable generator. Recently I built a DIY DC output UPS to keep our LAN alive during an outage when we are not running the generator. It replaced the DC wall warts on our networking gear.

Our cell service is provided by Republic Wireless, a Sprint MVNO. The cool feature is they are Wi-Fi first, as long as the phone has a stable Wi-fi connection it uses that preferentially. So as long as we have Wi-Fi Internet access our cell phones works normally even if nearby cell sites loose power.
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It's a bit flatter
Therein lies the issue. In order to be able to do all those streams, flattening, or softening, the video is pretty much a must.

The only stuff I watch OTA these days is local news, Jimmy Kimmel and Nightline. Consider me a video purest... as much as possible anyway.

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post #60 of 163 Old 11-19-2018, 08:29 AM
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Thanks for the response. Our broadband is via DSL. Copper loop is fairly long 13k ft back to the central office, but no remote terminals to worry about. We occasionally experience extended power outages due to massive ice storms when we and most of the state are without power for a week. A one day outage is an adventure but after that it gets old.
Yikes. That's what, 6mbps?

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In terms of DSL speed I doubt shaving off 600 feet will make a huge difference and would be costly to implement. We would need to run 600 feet of cable, provide housing for the remote modem along with lightning protection and provide power from the house.
No, it would not. I was just saying that rear lots using DSL isn't as common, as 600 feet will often put people over the limit for distance for a certain speed, especially when you get into faster VDSL tiers, as then you're looking at 1-5kft maximum loop length for given tiers, so .6kft is a significant distance, on top of the fact that rear lots tend to be out in more rural areas away from the center of town where the CO is in the first place. My point is that if you could put a remote house up for cable, that would allow you to get a regular drop, and have cable speeds via your own fiber or VDSL connection from the modem to your house. It's a kludge though, I'd pick having an actual plant extension any day of the week.

This guy got Charter to run the plant right up to his house:

http://www.dslreports.com/forum/r30...de-of-the-road

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During an outage we can fire up a portable generator. Recently I built a DIY DC output UPS to keep our LAN alive during an outage when we are not running the generator. It replaced the DC wall warts on our networking gear.
That's pretty interesting, as opposed to the usual AC-DC-AC-DC method of charging and discharging a UPS with computer equipment. I'm not sure I would go to that effort versus just buying bigger UPSes, but it's a pretty cool approach.

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Our cell service is provided by Republic Wireless, a Sprint MVNO. The cool feature is they are Wi-Fi first, as long as the phone has a stable Wi-fi connection it uses that preferentially. So as long as we have Wi-Fi Internet access our cell phones works normally even if nearby cell sites loose power.
All the major carriers offer Wi-Fi calling these days, as does Google's Project Fi. If you want something cheap, I'd suggest taking a look at Project Fi, as you get native service on USCC, as well as Sprint and T-Mobile, so you're covered in rural northern New England as well as other places. AT&T and Verizon are more reliable, but they're probably more expensive than you want to pay if you're almost always using Wi-Fi anyway. I use Wi-Fi calling a lot on AT&T, and it's great for when there is weak cell service.

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Therein lies the issue. In order to be able to do all those streams, flattening, or softening, the video is pretty much a must.
I'd rather have a slightly flatter image that still has really good detail and color, but of course I'd still rather have a higher bitrate with more depth and detail and color. Hopefully ATSC 3.0 will deliver that with HEVC encoding.
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